Ginger

Ginger Root Organic, Zingiber officinale

Ginger has risen to be among the top 12 spices most consumed in the United States. It is commonly used to help with an upset stomach.  Item No: 1850-50

Ginger

Zingiber offinale

The use of ginger root as a cornerstone of Asian, Arabic and Indian cooking is well known. In North America ginger is more often used to sweeten cookies, desserts and the more familiar ginger ale. Aside from its culinary uses, ginger has been used medicinally for thousands in Asia where it grows in the fertile soil as a rhizome. The name ginger has a long etymological history but is ultimately derived from the Sanskit srngaveram meaning “horn body” - a reference to the shape of the root.

Ginger is best known for its traditional role as an anti-nauseant and its use as an effective remedy for motionsickness, upset stomach, morning-sickness and nausea following chemotherapy is well-supported by modern research. Its effectiveness post-surgery to reduce nausea has yielded mixed clinical results although much anecdotal evidence points to relief of symptoms. Taking ginger during pregnancy has been shown to be more effective than placebo for morning sickness, although it may take a few days before significant relief is experienced. There is a long history of its use during pregnancy although current scientific research is divided on its safety versus efficacy due to some in vitro reactions—as always, a health care professional should be consulted.

Gingerol, one of the active components of ginger, contains antipyretic, analgesic, antitussive, anti-inflammatory, sedative, antibiotic, and weak antifungal properties. Other compounds in the ginger root may amplify and alter these properties and it is generally recommended that the whole herb be consumed via the diet rather than in supplement form. Ginger is effective when taken at the first sign of a cold due to its diaphoretic effects and has been used as a folk remedy world-wide for fevers, sore throats, influenza, colds and migraines. This herb serves as a helpful digestive aid for colic, diarrhea, dysmenorrhea and may act as an emmenogogue (and thus is useful for cramps).

Other research supports the use of ginger for inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis because of its role in modifying inflammatory prostaglandins as well as the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathways. The use of fresh ginger shows promise in cases of heart disease due to its blood pressure lowering effects, its ability to increase insulin release, lower cholesterol, inhibit platelet aggregation, and hypoglycemic effects.

To enjoy the benefits of ginger, the powdered root can be added to meats, soups, stews, baking, desserts and marinades. Dietary consumption should not exceed the recommended 4 grams daily for adults.

To brew a decoction of ginger, finely slice some fresh ginger root and boil for 10-15 minutes in fresh water. This beverage can be consumed 1-3 times daily—at the onset of a cold, for nausea or preventatively.

GINGER MAY INTERACT WITH BLOOD THINNERS SUCH AS WARFARIN AND ALTER PLATELET AGGREGATION THUS A HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL SHOULD BE CONSULTED. SIDE EFFECT —ALTHOUGH RARE - OF EXCESS GINGER CONSUMPTION MAY INCLUDE HEARTBURN, GASTROINTESTINAL UPSET, GAS ,BLOATING ORAL IRRITATION THE USE OF GINGER SHOULD BE AVOIDED FOR THOSE WITH GINGER ALLERGIES. A HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL SHOULD BE CONSULTED PRIOR TO USE IN PREGNANCY AND FOR THOSE WITH GALLSTONES.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Canadian Food & Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. www.distinctlytea.com 519-578-2010 distinctlytea@rogers.com

Research compiled and summarized by Keila McCullough BHSc, ND (cand.) Distinctly Tea Inc.

Sources:
“Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials”. Ernst E, Pittler MH. Br J Anaesth. 2000 Mar;84(3):367-71.

“Ginger”. University of Maryland Medical Centre. http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/

“Ginger: an overview”.White B. Am Fam Physician. 2007 Jun 1;75(11):1689-91.

“Ginger: history and use”. Langner E, Greifenberg S, Gruenwald J. Adv Ther 1998;15:25-44.

“Ginger lowers blood pressure through blockade of voltage-dependent calcium channels.” Ghayur MN, Gilani AH. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2005;45:74-80.

“Ginger” Monograph. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.

“Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and rheumatic disorders”. Srivastava KC, Mustafa T. Med Hypotheses 1989;29:25-8.

“Ginger (Zingiber Officinale Roscoe) Professional Monograph”. Natural Standard.
www.naturalstandard.com

“Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy”. Quinla JD, Hill DA. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Jul 1;68(1):121-8.

“The use of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) as a potential anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent”. Thomson M, Al-Qattan KK, Al-Sawan SM, et al. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2002;67:475-8.

Research compiled and summarized by Keila McCullough BHSc, ND (cand.)


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