Peppermint

Peppermint Leaf Organic

Very flavourful peppermint leaf organically grown. A favourite with our customers.  Item No: 1500-50

Peppermint

Mentha Piperita

The familiar taste of peppermint is so pervasive in our culture and it is sometimes easy to forget that there is a great deal of medicinal value to this common garden herb. The use of peppermint—in food, cosmetics and medicinally—dates back as far as the ancient Greeks and Egyptians, the Icelandic people in the 13th century and later,Western Europe and the British Isles. Peppermint grows freely throughout the Northern Hemisphere in the wild and will quite quickly will take over a garden.

Peppermint is traditionally known for its anti-spasmodic properties and thus is effective as a smooth muscle relaxant - easing the pains of colic, dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, flatulence and is helpful as a intraluminal spasmolytic agent for barium enemas and endoscopy procedures. There is a growing number of controlled studies, case reports and a few systematic reviews to support all of these effects. A tea of peppermint (or a gargle) is also effective after a meal to sweeten the breath, or can be used in cases of mouth, oral mucosal and pharyngeal inflammation. Peppermint is also said to increase internal temperature, act as a diaphoretic and an immuno-modulator —making it useful at the first onset of fever, cold or influenza. There is also evidence to support peppermint as being a mild stimulant and studies have shown it to increase general arousal and improve task performance.

Much research on peppermint is centered on the use of menthol—one of the active compounds of peppermint - in the form of peppermint oil. One half of the world’s supply of peppermint oil comes from the North-Eastern United States and the Southern-most areas of Ontario. This oil is often added to creams and ointments for relaxing tired or strained muscles and producing a cooling effect.

Peppermint also acts as a local anaesthetic and analgesic and can be applied topically (as an ointment or wash) for relief of tension headaches, toothache, fever, urticaria, prurtitis, myalgia and neuralgia.

Peppermint also possesses antiviral, antibacterial components and is effective as an insect repellent. Head lice may be deterred when peppermint oil (in conjunction with tea tree oil) is applied to the scalp. It may be used to offset morning sickness, nausea, dysmenorrhea, respiratory tract infections, diarrhea, and intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

To prepare a cup of refreshing peppermint tea, pour one cup of hot water (not boiling) over 1-2 teaspoons of dried leaves. Allow to steep for up to 10 minutes.

This tea is delicious served hot or cold, used as a cooled wash for insect bites and burns or as a gargle for mouth sores. Dried mint leaves can also be added to soups, stews, meat dishes, desserts etc for a fresh flavor.

THERE IS SOME EVIDENCE TO SUGGEST THAT PEPPERMINT MAY HINDER THE ABSORPTION OF IRON POST-MEAL THUS A HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL SHOULD BE CONSULTED PRIOR TO CONSUMPTION IN CASES OF ANEMIA. THE USE OF ANTACIDS SHOULD BE AVOIDED WHEN TAKING PEPPERMINT OIL AS THIS CAN SPEED GASTRIC MOTILITY AND CAUSE DIARRHEA AND BURNING SENSATIONS ON VOIDING DUE TO IMPAIRED METABOLISM OF PEPPERMINT OIL. HIGH DOSES OF PEPPERMINT OIL THEORETICALLY MAY INTERFERE WITH CYTOCHROME P450 SUBSTRATES AND BLOOD PRESSURE MEDICATIONS THUS REACTIONS WHILE TAKING PEPPERMINT OIL SHOULD BE CLOSELY MONITORED IF TAKING THESE MEDICATIONS. ANIMAL STUDIES HAVE SHOWN INCREASED SECRETION OF LEUTINIZING HORMONE AND FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE ASWELL AS DECREASED TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN MALE ANIMALS WITH INCREASED CONSUMPTION OF PEPPERMINT.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Canadian Food & Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. www.distinctlytea.com 519-578-2010 distinctlytea@rogers.com

Research compiled and summarized by Keila McCullough BHSc, ND (cand.) Distinctly Tea Inc.

Sources:
“A comparison of botanical and synthetic substances commonly used to prevent head lice (Pediculus humanus var. capitis) infestation”. Canyon DV, Speare R. Int J Dermatol. 2007 Apr;46(4):422-6.

“A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.)”. McKay DL, Blumberg JB. Phytother Res. 2006 Aug;20(8):619-33.

“Complementary and alternative medicine in gastroenterology: the good, the bad, and the ugly”. Koretz RL, Rotblatt M. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2004 Nov;2(11):957-67.

“Improved performance on clerical tasks associated with administration of peppermint odor”. Barker S, Grayhem P, Koon J, Perkins J,Whalen A, Raudenbush B. Percept Mot Skills. 2003 Dec;97(3 Pt 1):1007- 10.

“Inhibition of non-haem iron absorption in man by polyphenolic-containing beverages”. Hurrell RF, Reddy M, Cook JD. Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr; 81(4):289-95.

“Peppermint”. Botanical.com

“Peppermint (Mentha X. piperita L.)” Bottom Line Monograph. Natural Standard.
www.naturalstandard.com

“Peppermint” Monograph. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. http://www.naturaldatabase.

Research compiled and summarized by Keila McCullough BHSc, ND (cand.)


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